Immunobullous Skin Diseases Screening

Diagnosis

Indications for Testing

  • Blistering or other inflammatory skin disease without obvious etiology
  • See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Laboratory Testing

  • Initial testing
    • Perilesional skin biopsy for direct immunofluorescence (DIF) plus appropriate serum antibody tests by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are important for initial diagnosis of immunobullous skin diseases
      • Skin tissue biopsy specimens are more sensitive than serum tests but serum tests permit distinguishing the various disorders and monitoring disease activity
    • Serum antibody tests – distinguish between the various disorders and permit monitoring of disease activity
      • Pemphigus and pemphigoid panels (tissue transglutaminase [tTG] or epithelial antibodies for dermatitis herpetiformis)
        • Autoantibodies correlate with disease activity and are useful in monitoring response to therapy after established diagnosis
        • Autoantibodies may be present in normal individuals, although usually in low titers and/or levels – correlate with clinical findings
Predictive Value of Immunodermatology Tests

Disease

Serology
(Cutaneous IFA and ELISA)

Histology
(Cutaneous DIF)

Pemphigus

70-80% of patients demonstrate IgG antibodies to epithelial cell surface components by IFA; 90% or more have desmoglein 1 and/or desmoglein 3 IgG antibodies by ELISA (desmoglein 1 IgG antibodies predominate in pemphigus foliaceus, and desmoglein 3 IgG antibodies predominate in pemphigus vulgaris)

Respective antibodies correlate with disease activity

>90% of patients have epidermal or epithelial cell surface IgG and/or C3 staining in perilesional skin

(Rarely, IgA cell surface antibodies in IgA pemphigus; note that IgA pemphigus is much less common than other pemphigus types)

Bullous pemphigoid

70-80% of patients demonstrate IgG antibodies to basement membrane zone (BMZ) components by IFA, with epidermal or combined epidermal-dermal staining on split skin

80% or more have BP230 (BPAg1) and/or BP180 (BPAg2) IgG antibodies by ELISA, which may be more sensitive than IFA and may correlate with disease activity

>90% of patients have characteristic linear deposition of IgG and C3 (also IgA) along the BMZ in perilesional skin
Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita~50% of patients demonstrate IgG antibodies to BMZ components, with dermal staining on split skin by IFA>95% of patients show strong IgG and C3 in a thick linear BMZ band in perilesional skin; other immunoglobulins may also be present
Linear IgA disease70-80% of patients demonstrate IgA antibodies to BMZ components by IFA, with epidermal, combined epidermal-dermal, or (rarely) dermal staining on split skin100% of patients have characteristic linear staining of IgA along the BMZ in perilesional skin; C3 and/or IgG and IgM linear staining may also be present
Dermatitis herpetiformis

70-80% of patients demonstrate IgA endomysial antibodies by IFA (highly sensitive and specific for the disease)

IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies by ELISA – slightly less specific but highly sensitive

Respective antibodies correlate with disease activity

>95% of patients have granular and/or fibrillar IgA in dermal papillae of perilesional skin
Bullous lupus erythematosus

Antinuclear antibodies and circulating antibodies to BMZ components by IFA are typically IgG in a combined epidermal-dermal or dermal staining pattern on split skin; IgG BP180 antibodies detected by ELISA may be present (but are rarely IgG BP230 antibodies); type VII collagen antibodies are also commonly present (dermal pattern staining on split skin)

Rare disorder – predictive values not available

Linear and/or dense granular IgG, IgM, and often IgA staining along BMZ in perilesional skin; immunohistological findings are often used to make the diagnosis (>95% likely have these findings)

Rare disorder – predictive values not available

Chronic ulcerative stomatitis

IgG stratified epithelial-specific antinuclear antibodies on specific esophagus substrates

Newly described entity; predictive values not available

100% have IgG antibodies to nuclei of basal and lower 1/3 of keratinocyte cell layers, with stratified epithelial-specific antinuclear antibody pattern

Subset also demonstrates linear to shaggy fibrinogen BMZ staining pattern

Pemphigoid (herpes) gestationis

~85% of patients demonstrate HG factor (HG IgG) by complement fixing IFA and BP180 (BPAg2) antibodies by ELISA

~25% have IgG BMZ antibodies

>95% of patients have intense linear C3 at BMZ; 25-50% show linear IgG BMZ staining in perilesional skin
VasculitisAntinuclear antibodies and/or antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies50-60% of patients with immune-mediated vasculitis demonstrate antibodies in dermal blood vessels in early lesion (24-48 hours old)
Clinical presentation and diagnostic testing for immunobullous skin diseases
Clinical Presentation and Diagnostic Testing for Immunobullous Skin Diseases

PEMPHIGUS

Clinical presentation

Serum autoantibodies

Perilesional biopsy staining

Pemphigus vulgaris

Mucosal involvement is prominent; flaccid bullae with Nikolsky sign; erosions and crusting

Pemphigus vegetans

Variant with vegetating intertriginous plaques and oral involvement including cerebriform tongue

IgG epithelial cell surface by IFA; correlates with disease activity

Desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 IgG antibodies by ELISA also correlate with disease activity and can help distinguish pemphigus subtypes  

Epidermal IgG and C3 cell surface (intercellular substance) staining

Pemphigus foliaceus

Superficial bullae, erosions, and scale with crusting; Nikolsky sign present

Pemphigus erythematosus 

Variant  of pemphigus foliaceus with lupus features

IgG epithelial cell surface by IFA; correlates with disease activity

Desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 IgG antibodies by ELISA also correlate with disease activity and can help distinguish pemphigus subtypes

Epidermal IgG and C3 cell surface (intercellular substance) staining; in pemphigus erythematosus variant, IgG, IgM, IgA and/or complement granular immune deposits at the BMZ

Drug-induced pemphigus

Pemphigus vulgaris or pemphigus foliaceus

Implicated drugs:

  • Thiol-containing medication implicated in 80% – penicillamine or captopril, pyritinol, thioproline, piroxicam, thiamazole, and gold sodium thiomalate
  • Masked thiols – penicillin, piroxicam, cephalosporins, rifampin
  • Others – enalapril and dipyrone

IgG epithelial cell surface by IFA; correlates with disease activity

Desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 IgG antibodies by ELISA also correlate with disease activity and can help distinguish pemphigus subtypes

Epidermal IgG and C3 cell surface (intercellular substance) staining

IgA pemphigus

  • Pruritic vesicles and pustules in subcorneal pustular dermatosis variant
  • Variable skin lesions with numerous pustules in intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis variant

IgA epithelial cell surface by IFA; correlates with disease activity

Epidermal IgA cell surface staining

Paraneoplastic pemphigus

Flaccid bullae, lichenoid or erythema multiforme-like; usually involves mucosa, often extensively; esophageal and respiratory involvement

IgG epithelial cell surface and BMZ by IFA (staining on rodent bladder epithelium is characteristic); correlates with disease activity

Epidermal IgG and C3 cell surface and BMZ staining

PEMPHIGOID

Clinical presentation

Serum autoantibodies

Perilesional biopsy staining

Bullous pemphigoid and variants (urticarial, localized, drug-induced)

Tense bullae, often on urticarial base, prominent pruritus; variant forms may not have bullae and may resemble other more common dermatoses; oral involvement; most cases are idiopathic

Minority are drug induced

  • Antibiotics – penicillins, ciprofloxacin, chloroquine
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors – captopril, enalapril
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Phenacetin
  • Nifedipine
  • Terbinafine
  • Furosemide

IgG BMZ, epidermal or combined by IFA; BP180 and/or BP230 IgG antibodies by ELISA correlate with disease activity

Linear BMZ IgG (linear and n-serrated patterns) and linear C3; linear IgM, IgA and IgE may be present

Mucous membrane (cicatricial, ocular, antiepiligrin, anti-laminin-332)

Tense bullae and erosions, scarring sequelae, ocular and oral

IgG BMZ, epidermal or combined, rare dermal; IgG BP180 antibodies by ELISA

Linear BMZ IgG (n-serrated) and C3

PEMPHIGOID GESTATIONIS
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining
Variable skin lesions ranging from urticarial to vesicles to tense blisters on skin with pronounced pruritus; onset during or after pregnancyIgG complement-fixing BMZ antibodies and IgG BP180 antibodiesC3 and, less commonly, IgG linear BMZ staining

EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA ACQUISITA

Clinical presentation

Serum autoantibodies

Perilesional biopsy staining

Tense bullae commonly occurs in areas of trauma and in oral mucosa

IgG BMZ, rarely IgA, dermal

Linear BMZ IgG (u-serrated) and C3; may show linear IgA and IgM BMZ staining

LINEAR IgA DERMATOSIS
(Linear IgA bullous dermatosis and chronic bullous disease of childhood)
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining

Tense bullae, similar to bullous pemphigoid; oral involvement common in adult disease; annular blisters (“cluster of jewels” or “string of pearls”); most cases are idiopathic

Some cases are drug induced

  • Antibiotics – vancomycin, ceftriaxone, cefamandole, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, penicillins, rifampin
  • Cardiac drugs –captopril, benazepril,  furosemide, atorvastatin, amiodarone
  • NSAIDs – diclofenac, piroxicam
  • Chemotherapeutic agents – interleukin-2, interferon-gamma, somatostatin, gemcitabine
  • Antiseizure – vigabatrin, phenytoin
  • Glibenclamide
  • Diethylcarbamazine
  • Cyclosporin
  • Lithium
IgA BMZ, epidermal, or combined (rarely dermal)Linear BMZ IgA (n-serrated and u-serrated) may have IgG and C3 (less-intense BMZ staining)
DERMATITIS HERPETIFORMIS
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining
Small bullae or erythematous papules, patches, plaques on extensor surfaces (elbows and knees, also scalp and buttocks); markedly pruritic; associated with intestinal gluten sensitivity; often nontypical presentation because of severe pruritus with eczematous features (distribution is important in making the diagnosis)IgA endomysial and transglutaminase antibodies; correlates with disease activity and compliance with gluten-free dietGranular BMZ IgA with stippling in dermal papillae; occasionally fibrillar IgA staining
BULLOUS LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining
Tense bullae, photodistributedIgG BMZ, dermal or combinedLinear BMZ IgG; also may show granular IgM and C3 BMZ as in lupus band
LICHEN PLANUS
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining

Multiple subtypes; classical lesions are polygonal, flat-topped, violaceous papules and plaques with reticulated white scale (called Wickham striae); oral mucosa and/or cutaneous; may blister and/or erode

No specific serum antibodiesCytoid bodies staining with IgM and/or IgG, IgA, C3, and fibrinogen; prominent shaggy fibrinogen BMZ staining
CHRONIC ULCERATIVE STOMATITIS
Clinical presentationSerum autoantibodiesPerilesional biopsy staining
Pain and erosive lesions commonly involving tongue, also buccal mucosa and gingival tissue with desquamative gingivitis; less frequently involves labial mucosa and hard palateIgG stratified epithelial specific antinuclear antibodies on specific esophagus substratesIgG antibodies to nuclei of basal and lower 1/3 of keratinocyte cell layers with stratified epithelial-specific antinuclear antibody pattern and linear to shaggy fibrinogen BMZ staining pattern

Clinical Background

Immunobullous skin diseases are autoimmune blistering diseases affecting skin and mucous membranes and are caused by or associated with the deposition of specific antibodies on cutaneous structures. They include the following

Epidemiology

  • Incidence – 1-2/1,000,000
    • Pemphigoid – 10-13/1,000,000
    • Pemphigus – 1-5/1,000,000
  • Age – usually occurs in 40s-50s; can occur in childhood
    • Linear IgA disease – most common immunobullous childhood disease; appears as a chronic bullous disease
    • Pemphigoid (herpes) gestationis occurs in females during childbearing years
    • Incidence of bullous pemphigoid significantly increases after age 70 (15-18/100,000)
  • HLA class II associations

Clinical Presentation

  • Although the various immunobullous skin diseases are characterized by clinical and histological features, presentation is often atypical and shows overlap with other immunobullous diseases or with more common skin diseases (eg, eczema, urticaria)
  • Classic features – blistering or erosive lesions
  • Wide range and variability of lesional types, often with prominent itching, secondary lesions, eczema, or urticaria
  • Histology varies with each immunobullous disease
    • Eosinophil infiltration and eosinophil-associated spongiosis common in IgG autoantibody immunobullous disease
    • Neutrophil infiltration common in IgA autoantibody immunobullous disease

Indications for Laboratory Testing

  • Tests generally appear in the order most useful for common clinical situations
  • Click on number for test-specific information in the ARUP Laboratory Test Directory
Test Name and Number Recommended Use Limitations Follow Up
Cutaneous Direct Immunofluorescence, Biopsy 0092572
Method: Direct Immunofluorescence
(Direct Fluorescent Antibody Stain)

Order concurrently with serum antibody testing and fixed tissue histopathology for assessment of patient with pruritic, urticarial, blistering and/or erosive disorders, including possible pemphigoid and pemphigoid variants, pemphigus and pemphigus subtypes, dermatitis herpetiformis, epidermolysis bullous acquisita, porphyria, and pseudoporphyria

Order concurrently with fixed tissue histopathology for assessment of patient with inflammatory, immune-mediated cutaneous disease, including possible lupus and lupus variants, vasculitis, drug reactions, lichen planus and lichenoid reactions

For skin involvement, biopsy perilesional skin

For mucous membrane involvement, biopsy nonlesional mucosa

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

May be inaccurate if tissue not taken from correct perilesional location (attached/intact epithelium or epidermis needed)

Not possible to reliably distinguish pemphigoid from epidermolysis bullosa acquisita or to distinguish pemphigus subtypes based on direct immunofluorescence (DIF); concurrent serum testing needed

Tissue must be submitted in Michel’s or Zeus medium; this test cannot be performed on formalin-fixed tissue

Initial concurrent and repeat serum testing with pemphigoid and pemphigus panels is the most sensitive for diagnosis, for determining antibody profiles, and for following disease activity

Patients with indeterminate results should have repeat DIF biopsy

Patients with changing clinical features should have repeat DIF biopsy because antibody profiles may change over time

Pemphigoid Antibody Panel - Epithelial Basement Membrane Zone Antibodies, IgG and IgA, BP180 and BP230 Antibodies, IgG 0092001
Method: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Preferred antibody panel for initial diagnostic assessment and disease monitoring in pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and linear IgA bullous dermatosis

Panel components include IgG and IgA epithelial BMZ antibodies and IgG bullous pemphigoid BP180 & 230 antigens

To order individual component tests, refer to antibody testing for IgG BMZ, IgA BMZ, and/or IgG bullous pemphigoid BP180 & 230 antigens

To screen for pemphigoid along with other possible immunobullous diseases, order concurrently with the pemphigus antibody panel  IgG collagen type VII antibody, AND perilesional skin biopsy for direct immunofluorescence

Concurrent perilesional skin biopsy for DIF is important for diagnosis because of increased sensitivity (85-100% of pemphigus, pemphigoid, linear IgA disease, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and dermatitis herpetiformis cases are positive)

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Clinical correlation necessary because the incidence of false positives, although rare, increases with age

Because of clinical overlap among immunobullous diseases and similar names, pemphigoid testing may be confused with pemphigus testing and inadvertently misordered

Use pemphigoid panel to monitor pemphigoid disease activity; use relevant tests to monitor other immunobullous disease activity

Repeat pemphigoid panel for indeterminate results and/or continuing clinical consideration of immunobullous disease

Pemphigus Antibody Panel - Epithelial Cell Surface Antibodies and Desmoglein 1 and Desmoglein 3 Antibodies, IgG 0090650
Method: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Preferred panel for initial assessment and disease monitoring in IgG-variant pemphigus

Panel components include antibody testing for IgG epithelial cell surface and IgG desmoglein 1 and 3; to order individual component tests, refer to epithelial skin antibody and/or desmoglein 1 and 3 antibodies in pemphigus, IgG

To screen for pemphigus along with other possible immunobullous diseases, order concurrently with antibody panel test for pemphigoid, IgG collagen type VII antibody, AND perilesional skin biopsy for direct immunofluorescence

Concurrent perilesional skin biopsy for DIF is important for diagnosis because of increased sensitivity (85-100% of pemphigus, pemphigoid, linear IgA disease, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, and dermatitis herpetiformis cases are positive)

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Clinical correlation is necessary because cell surface antibodies by IFA, usually in low titers, may be found in normal individuals (possible blood group reactivity) or in patients with fungal infections, burns, drug reactions, and other dermatoses, including other immunobullous diseases

Because of clinical overlap among immunobullous diseases and similar names, pemphigoid testing may be confused with pemphigus testing and inadvertently misordered

Testing for IgG pemphigus antibody types (most common) also may be confused with IgA pemphigus testing (rare disorder)

Use pemphigus panel to monitor pemphigus disease activity; use relevant tests to monitor other immunobullous disease activity

Repeat pemphigus panel for indeterminate results and/or continuing clinical consideration of immunobullous disease

Epithelial Skin Antibody 0090299
Method: Indirect Immunofluorescence
(Indirect Fluorescent Antibody)

General screen for immunobullous diseases

Test includes IgG and IgA BMZ antibodies (pemphigoid, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, linear IgA disease) and IgG and IgA cell surface antibodies (IgG and IgA pemphigus subtypes)

Consider ordering concurrently with IgG bullous pemphigoid (BP180 & 230) antigens for suspected pemphigoid and/or IgG desmoglein 1 and 3 antibodies for suspected pemphigus

For more sensitive and specific testing for pemphigoid or pemphigus, refer to antibody panels for pemphigus or pemphigoid

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Does not include testing for antibodies to target pemphigoid antigens, BP180 and BP230, or to target pemphigus antigens desmoglein 1 and 3 which may be more sensitive diagnostic markers in some cases (levels  correlate with disease activity)

Although helpful in screening for immunobullous disease, test is not as sensitive as combination of pemphigus and pemphigoid panels

Use epithelial skin antibody test or both pemphigoid and pemphigus panels to follow patients with changing clinical features because antibody profiles may change over time

Herpes Gestationis Factor (Complement-Fixing Basement Membrane Zone Antibody IgG) 0092283
Method: Quantitative Indirect Immunofluorescence

Assess and monitor patient with possible pemphigoid gestationis (herpes gestationis); consider other types of immunobullous disease testing, (ie, IgA epithelial BMZ, IgG collagen type VII, and/or pemphigus antibody panel)

Use along with perilesional skin biopsy for DIF to diagnose pemphigoid (herpes) gestationis

Use to follow persistent or recurrent disease activity with antibody titers

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

  Use herpes gestationis factor test to monitor disease, including IgG BP180 antibody levels; use relevant tests to monitor other immunobullous disease activity
Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Antibody Screen 0092107
Method: Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Assess patient with possible paraneoplastic pemphigus

If other, more common, types of pemphigus are of diagnostic consideration, order the antibody panel test for pemphigus first or concurrently with this test

If IgA paraneoplastic antibody testing is required, contact ARUP Laboratories

Use along with perilesional skin biopsy for DIF to aid in diagnosis of paraneoplastic pemphigus

Use to follow persistent or recurrent disease activity with antibody titers

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

   
Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody, IgA with Reflex to Endomysial Antibody, IgA by IFA 0050734
Method: Semi-Quantitative Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/Semi-Quantitative Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Use along with pemphigoid and pemphigus panel tests and epidermal transglutaminase antibody, IgA, or use with epithelial skin antibody and epidermal transglutaminase antibody, IgA testing to initially diagnose and discriminate among the immunobullous skin diseases in patients suspected or known to have any type of immunobullous disease

Reflex pattern – if tTG IgA is ≥20 units, then EMA IgA by IFA testing will be added

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Does not detect IgG or IgA BMZ or cell surface antibodies that characterize immunobullous diseases other than dermatitis herpetiformis

Use tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody, IgA with reflex to endomysial antibody, IgA by IFA for initial diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis and to follow disease activity in dermatitis herpetiformis; use relevant tests to monitor other immunobullous disease activity

Repeat test for indeterminate results and/or continuing clinical consideration of immunobullous disease

Epithelial Basement Membrane Zone Antibody IgA 0092057
Method: Indirect Immunofluorescence
(Indirect Fluorescent Antibody)

Assess and monitor patient with linear IgA disease, including linear IgA bullous dermatosis and positive IgA BMZ antibodies, either epidermal (roof) pattern or dermal (floor) pattern

Consider ordering concurrently with IgG antibody testing for epithelial BMZ, bullous pemphigoid (BP180 & 230) antigens, and/or collagen type VII

See Immunobullous Skin Diseases Testing algorithm

Although helpful in screening for immunobullous disease, not as sensitive as combination of pemphigus and pemphigoid panels

Clinical correlation necessary because incidence of false positives, although rare, increases with age

Specific for IgA BMZ antibodies found in linear IgA disease and will not detect IgG BMZ antibodies found in pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita or cell surface antibodies found in pemphigus

Use epithelial IgA BMZ IgA antibody or pemphigoid panel tests to monitor linear IgA disease activity and response to therapy; use relevant tests to monitor other immunobullous disease activity

Repeat epithelial IgA basement membrane zone IgA antibody or pemphigoid panel for indeterminate results and/or continuing clinical consideration of linear IgA disease

Additional Tests Available
 
Click the plus sign to expand the table of additional tests.
Test Name and NumberComments
Epithelial Basement Membrane Zone Antibody IgG 0092056
Method: Indirect Immunofluorescence
(Indirect Fluorescent Antibody)

Monitor disease in patient with pemphigoid or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita who has positive IgG BMZ antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence, either epidermal (roof) pattern or dermal (floor) pattern, on split skin substrate

Consider ordering concurrently with IgG antibody testing for bullous pemphigoid (BP180 & 230) antigens and/or collagen type VII

May use to screen for pemphigoid and other immunobullous diseases; however, this test has decreased sensitivity and specificity when compared to the panel tests for pemphigus antibodies or pemphigoid antibodies and will not detect IgA BMZ antibodies

Bullous Pemphigoid Antigens (180 kDa and 230 kDa), IgG 0092566
Method: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

Monitor disease in patient previously diagnosed with pemphigoid and increased antibodies for IgG BP180 and/or BP230; IgG BP180 antibody levels correlate with disease activity

For initial diagnosis and assessment of disease progression or changes, the preferred test is the pemphigoid antibody panel; panel components include IgG and IgA epithelial BMZ antibodies and IgG bullous pemphigoid (BP180 and 230) antigens

To determine the involvement of IgG BMZ antibodies and pattern of reactivity on split skin substrate, order with antibody testing for IgG epithelial BMZ; also, consider other types of BMZ antibody-associated disease testing, (ie, IgA epithelial BMZ, IgG collagen type VII, or herpes gestationis factor

Desmoglein 1 and Desmoglein 3 Antibodies in Pemphigus, IgG 0090649
Method: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

Monitor disease in patient previously diagnosed with pemphigus and increased IgG desmoglein 1 and/or 3 antibodies; antibody levels correlate with disease activity; consider ordering with IgG epithelial cell surface antibody

If used to screen for pemphigus, this test has decreased sensitivity and specificity when compared to the pemphigus antibody panel

For initial diagnosis and monitoring disease, the antibody panel testing for pemphigus is preferred; panel components include IgG antibody testing for epithelial cell surface and IgG desmoglein 1 and 3

For diagnosing rare types of pemphigus, refer to IgA pemphigus antibody and paraneoplastic pemphigus

Concurrent perilesional skin biopsy for DIF is helpful with diagnosis because doing so increases sensitivity (>90% of pemphigus cases are positive), although it is not possible to reliably distinguish pemphigus subtypes based on DIF

Epithelial Cell Surface Antibody IgG 0090266
Method: Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Monitor patient with pemphigus who has positive IgG cell surface antibodies, but normal IgG desmoglein 1 and/or 3 antibody levels

For initial diagnosis and disease monitoring, the preferred test is the pemphigus antibody panel; panel components include IgG epithelial cell surface antibodies and IgG desmoglein 1 and 3

May use to screen for pemphigus or pemphigoid; however, this test has decreased sensitivity and specificity when compared to the panel tests for pemphigus antibodies or pemphigoid antibodies

Pemphigus Antibody IgA 0092106
Method: Indirect Fluorescent Antibody

Assess and monitor patient with possible IgA pemphigus, a RARE disease with certain clinical and histopathological subtypes

If other types of pemphigus are of diagnostic consideration, order the panel test for pemphigus antibodies first or concurrently with this test